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Experts against Combat
With Brian Jewell and Jeremy Bentham
A Two Part Blog
Brian Jewell
Wed, Jan 20, 10:48 AM (3 days ago)
Thoughts On Certifications: Part 1
When I was working in security, part of my job was to train the new officers in the proper uses of pepper spray and the collapsible baton. I enjoyed doing this because I liked teaching and it got m…
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James,
Hope all is well. My last blog was so long I had to split it into two parts. Well, the angle of the subject matter is slightly different as well. The first part I started writing in 2018 and just changed my mind until this weekend. Then I wrote the second part this past Sunday. I am interested in your thoughts in the subject if you have any on them matter discussed in the article.
(While I did not mention any names in the article and am still not going to mention the name of the teacher who "ghosted" me, I will share with you that the person I am thinking of reaching out to with regards to continuing my internal arts studies is [redacted]).
Thanks,
Brian

Brian, I liked this piece. Of course, I have never been certified in anything other than operating a tow-motor. I was a registered USA Boxing couch for three years and was never certified because Larry Brizzy was afraid I was going to talk boxers into stick-fighting, something else I was never certified in. This is fascinating, in that men with multiple Escrima certifications, such as Sifu Tom Clarke and David Lumsden, used me as an applications coach—were fully confident that I was the best man to teach combat applications of their curriculum, even though I did not know their curriculum. That is because these men were fighters, and they knew that I had fought more often than they and trusted me, partially because I was not certified, was not looking to cash in on lesson fees. I trained guys so that I would have someone to spar with.
Over all certification is a bullshit racket and I have declined free offers to get me certified from various masters, both ethical and unethical actors, good men and bad.
Sensei Steve Jansen is probably the best karate instructor in the Baltimore Area, yet he is one of the lowest ranking, because he teaches rather than seeks certification.
The Sigung you mentioned, is a good man, who actually fought in Taiwan and treated my men and I fairly and honorably, so I think he is a good choice.
Right now, our entire nation is in chaos over "following the science" as a religion rather than using science as an investigative tool. I've seen all this before in the combat arts.
Below is a link sent to me by Jeremy about a study of why the rotational uppercut is a knockout blow. This is a totally baseless and misleading study which takes a look at the shovel hook, misidentifying that rotational blow as an uppercut, which it is not. The uppercut scores very few KOs as it just tilts the brain and does not spin it within the skull. It is a set up punch. If the elbow is outside of or above the hip rather than over the pelvis and up your own center line, than it is a shovel hook, not an uppercut.
So here is a study about brain effects of one punch attributed by mistake or on purpose to a more dramatically named punch, to convince non-combatant humans to remain helpless sheep in their feed lot of souls. The study does look at the effects of the hook, and is accurate there. However, it is presented as a study of the uppercut, and if you are not a coach or fighter you would be misled by the report, which has an imbedded mistake, which is then plucked by the media as the headline, causing a two-step and very likely unintentional falsification—no conspiracy needed when unassailable experts are in involved.
Once again, the falsification of reality is best conducted by certified experts using science to lie and mislead, whether by mistake, on purpose or as a combined chain of mistaking and misleading.
The first, crushing picture used in the article is of a shovel hook. The second, marginally effective punch used, is of an uppercut.

"The findings indicate that straight-on punches are less likely to knock boxers out than rotating punches, such as uppercuts to the chin. In this image, Japanese Olympic gold medalist Ryota Murata (R) connects with a left uppercut against Gunnar Jackson (L) of New Zealand"
It has long been known that the hook is the big KO weapon, not just because of rotational force, but because it is more often unseen and it is more likely to hit the side of the head and jaw. The uppercut uses drive mechanics more like the straight punch, and is not rotational.
Below is Jeremy's heads up.
Thanks.

James, FYI.
Very interesting.
Of course, since research science has become intensely politicized, one never knows how much validity one can give to such studies. These days one is more likely to receive research grants for studies that support Leftist, counter-western culture positions, and agendas.
Speaking of agendas, studies like this will naturally be referred to as more evidence as to why many full contact sports should have most of the contact removed from them.
Will boxing be outlawed? Will the NFL become a flag football league?
The Leftist ‘precautionary principle’ tells us that any loss of freedom of choice will be well worth it ‘if it saves one life’. What then of all the lives sacrificed in wars fought to putatively preserve our freedom and sovereignty? What then of the lives sacrificed in the exploration of outer space? Well obviously not worth the cost, on both counts. If we are to take what the Leftist collectivists say at face value that is.
Jeremy
Egg experiment explains why rotating uppercut punches knock boxers out

Final crackpot note:
Once firearms have been more effectively removed from the U.S. population, activities like boxing—as was the case in America and Great Britain 200 years ago—will once again be against the law. This will enable human trafficking and population replacement and displacement to be conducted by marginal actors, such as medical staff, rather than SWAT teams. I'm expecting to see numerous statutes targeting combat arts instructors and practitioners involved in self-defense situations for civil and criminal charges and even hate crimes over the course of the 2020s.
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