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Vituperation & Wrack
From the Robert E. Howard Lexicon


“An icy calmness had always characterized his words and deeds. In the heat and vituperation of council, in the wild wrack of battle, Kelkor was always cool, never confused.”

-from an untitled draft of a Kull story

vi•tu•per•a•tion

vəˌt(y)o͞opəˈrāSHən,vīˌt(y)o͞opəˈrāSHən/

noun

noun: vituperation; plural noun: vituperations

1. bitter and abusive language.

synonyms: invective, condemnation, opprobrium, scolding, criticism, disapprobation, fault-finding; More

blame, abuse, insults, vilification, denunciation, obloquy, denigration, disparagement, slander, libel, defamation, slurs, aspersions;

vitriol, venom;

informalflak;

formalcastigation

antonyms: praise

wrack1

rak/

verb

verb: wrack; 3rd person present: wracks; gerund or present participle: wracking; past tense: wracked; past participle: wracked

1. variant spelling of rack1 (sense 1 of the verb).

wrack2

rak/

noun

noun: wrack

1. any of a number of coarse brown seaweeds that grow on the shoreline, frequently each kind forming a distinct band in relation to high- and low-water marks. Many have air bladders for buoyancy.

Origin

early 16th century: apparently from wrack4.

wrack3

rak/

noun

noun: wrack; plural noun: wracks

1. variant spelling of rack5.

Origin

late Middle English: variant of rack5.

wrack4

rak/

noun

archaicdialect

noun: wrack; plural noun: wracks

1. a wrecked ship; a shipwreck.

o wreckage.

Origin

late Middle English: from Middle Dutch wrak ; related to wreak and wreck.

rack1

rak/

verb

verb: wrack

1. 1.

cause extreme physical or mental pain to; subject to extreme stress.

"he was racked with guilt"

synonyms: torment, afflict, torture, agonize, harrow; More

plague, bedevil, persecute, wrack, trouble, worry

o historical

torture (someone) on the rack.

2. 2.

place in or on a rack.

3. 3.

archaic

raise (rent) above a fair or normal amount.

Origin

Middle English: from Middle Dutch rec, Middle Low German rek ‘horizontal bar or shelf,’ probably from recken ‘to stretch, reach’ (possibly the source of sense 1 of the verb).

rack5

rak/

noun

noun: wrack

1. 1.

a mass of high, thick, fast-moving clouds.

"there was a thin moon, a rack of cloud"

verb

archaic

verb: wrack

1. 1.

(of a cloud) be driven before the wind.

Origin

Middle English (denoting a rush or collision): probably of Scandinavian origin; compare with Norwegian and Swedish dialect rak ‘wreckage,’ from reka ‘to drive.’

A Well of Heroes

https://www.amazon.com/Well-Heroes-Literary-Impressions-Robert/dp/1534808256/ref=sr_1_6/180-6301626-9959864?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1467037854&sr=1-6&keywords=james+lafond

http://jameslafond.blogspot.com/

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